Shadowy Web Site Creates Blacklist of Pro-Palestinian Activists

Shadowy Web Site Creates Blacklist of Pro-Palestinian Activists

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Fighting for freedom in a way only Zionist McCarthyists understand
One of the beauties of Orwell’s 1984 and Newspeak is
that words can mean their exact opposite. 
So the film that the Canary Mission puts out asks people to ‘Join us to
protect freedom and make campus life safe for everyone’.  And how does one do that?  By ensuring that ‘todays radicals are not
tomorrow’s employees’.  In the name of
freedom the Canary Mission quite openly calls for the opposite i.e. denying the freedom to work of those with contrary opinions.  But as RH Tawney said, the freedom of the pike is death to the minnow.
Ensure that today’s radicals are not tomorrow’s employees intones the narrator in her best McCarthist style

The film itself itself of course tugs at the usual
heart strings.  It starts off with Jewish children wearing the Yellow Star during the Holocaust and then cuts to an idiot on a demonstration telling Jews
to get back to the ovens.  The clear
message being, of course, that most if not all supporters of the Palestinians
are just waiting for their chance to reenact the Holocaust.  And then the message at the end exhorts us to
believe that blacklisting and freedom are quite compatible.  But of course in the eyes of neo-con Daniel
Pipes and the Zionist cohorts, any crime is acceptable when defending Zionism and
Israel.

Tony Greenstein

US Zionists Reach for Uncle Joe McCarthy

A new website is publicizing the identities of
pro-Palestinian student activists to prevent them from getting jobs after they
graduate from college. But the website is keeping its own backers’ identity a
secret.
Everything is done in order to protect  future Jewish children from this – the Holocaust becomes a perverted Hollywood scene
“It is your duty to ensure that today’s radicals are not
tomorrow’s employees,”
a female narrator intones in a slick video posted to the website’s YouTube account.
The Enemy
Called Canary Mission, the site has posted profiles of
dozens of students and recent graduates, alongside those of well-known
activists like Omar Barghouti, founder of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions
movement. Some of the students are active in Students for Justice in Palestine;
others were involved in recent pro-BDS resolutions at campuses in California.
Many of them have relatively thin activist résumés.
One of the profiles listed
“The focus on young people and students is an effort to
try to tell people that there will be a price for you taking a political
position,”
said Ali Abunimah, founder of the pro-Palestinian website The
Electronic Intifada. “It’s an effort to punish and deter people from standing
up for what they believe.”
Daniel Pipes, president of the Middle East Forum,
defended the tactic as a way of forcing people to understand the seriousness of
their political stands.
A demonstration against Israel, with the focus on Islamic fundamentalists
“Factually documenting who one’s adversaries are and
making this information available is a perfectly legitimate undertaking,”
Pipes
wrote in an email. “Collecting information on students has particular value
because it signals them that attacking Israel is serious business, not some
inconsequential game, and that their actions can damage both Israel and their
future careers.”
Pictures of the Zionists enemies
Despite its dedication to documenting the identities of
pro-Palestinian activists, Canary Mission seems to have gone to great lengths
to keep the identities of its own members and backers well hidden. There are no
names of Canary Mission staff members, volunteers, donors or allies on the
site.
Another  profile
The Web domain is registered in a way that hides its
ownership. Though the site says that Canary Mission “is a non-profit
organization,”
no group called Canary Mission is currently registered with the
IRS as eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions, and the website
indicates no fiscal sponsor through which it can accept donations. The group’s
MailChimp account identifies its ZIP code as 10458, a corner of the Bronx that
includes Fordham University.
A person named Joanna responded via email to a request
for comment from the group, agreeing to an interview but then not calling this
reporter over two days. Joanna also did not respond to a list of questions
submitted about the group.
A handful of right-wing pro-Israel groups that focus on
campuses said they had no relationship with Canary Mission, including the David
Horowitz Freedom Center, Pipes’s Middle East Forum, the AMCHA Initiative and
StandWithUs.
When asked whether his group had supported Canary
Mission, Charles Jacobs, who runs Americans for Peace and Tolerance, a
far-right group that purports to expose extremism on campus, said he had no
comment. Jacobs is the founder of The David Project, which, under his
leadership, produced a 2004 documentary titled “Columbia Unbecoming” that
depicted Columbia’s Middle East studies department as unfriendly to Jewish
students.
Distributing lists of activists and their activities is
not an entirely uncommon tactic in the Middle East debate, on the left or the
right. A website called Masada2000, now offline, maintained what it called the
“Self-Hating and/or Israel Threatening” list of Jews whose views it considered
unacceptable. In early 2014, the anti-Zionist blog Mondoweiss uncovered a
password-protected website maintained by StandWithUs that contained
backgrounders on pro-Palestinian speakers on the campus circuit. On the left,
the website for Right Web, a program backed by the Institute for Policy
Studies, profiles hawkish pro-Israel groups and activists.
The individual dossiers on the Canary Mission’s site are
lengthy and detailed, and include videos and photographs of the activists. In
the case of some current students, the site lists their majors. There are links
to Facebook pages, Twitter pages and LinkedIn profiles, and lengthy
descriptions of pro-Palestinian student groups and movements to which these
students have alleged links.
“I think it’s creepy and I think it’s McCarthyist,” said
Max Geller, an SJP member who is profiled on the site. “This is not a badge of
honor. This is scary.”

Geller said that some of what is written about him on
the site is untrue, and that he has contacted an attorney. 

 

 

 

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